1

Tell me please if there is any difference between the following sentences.

  1. Once you do the task, you can go on to the next one.

  2. Once you have done the task, you can go on the next one.

Could the first mean that as soon as someone begin to do the task he can go on to the next one?

3
  • The first sentence is wrong. Do you have a source for this? Maybe you made a mistake while posting the question.
    – Varun Nair
    Apr 2, 2019 at 8:49
  • I have seen it being used in similar contexrts. For example: "once you get to know it, it is not very hard."" Apr 2, 2019 at 8:57
  • That's not what I meant. ' Once you do your the task...' - There is an unwanted 'the' in that sentence, that's making it invalid.
    – Varun Nair
    Apr 2, 2019 at 9:00

1 Answer 1

-1

Both sentences are incorrect. I have corrected them out for you:

  1. Once you do your task, you can go on to the next one.
  2. Once you have done the task, you can go on to the next one.

Both of these sentences are correct, if I'm not wrong. They mean the same thing too, with the only difference being the tenses. Notably, 'have done' falls under 'present perfect tense'.

1
  • 3
    Why is "your" better than "the" in this case (1)? Your sentence 2 is identical to the original sentence 2. And you claim that the original is wrong and that yours is correct.
    – virolino
    Apr 2, 2019 at 10:41

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .