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I am trying to explain how everything has its own advantages and disadvantages whilst not being insensitive as I am referring to the advantages and disadvantages of recruiting foreigners within a company.

I was thinking of using "every rose has its thorn" but I'm afraid that it may come off the wrong way.

Please note that this phrase will be a subtitle, introducing a section which goes into much more detail about the merits and drawbacks of recruiting foreigners. Therefore I am not looking to be overly specific in this subtitle.

  • I think we need some more context here. "Every rose has its thorn" is a proverb. Do you need to use a cliche? Who are you talking about? What do you mean by "come off the wrong way"? – James K Apr 3 at 19:23
  • What do you mean by referring to people? Does, "Everyone has his own strengths and weaknesses" better fit what you're wanting an idiom for? – Don B. Apr 3 at 19:23
  • Sorry, edited my post to be more clear. – YasG Apr 3 at 19:38
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You do not need to use a proverb in this situation. It would be far better to speak clearly and directly:

There are advantages and disadvantages to hiring overseas workers.

Using proverbs only hides what you want to say. It makes it harder for people to understand you. If you must you a proverb then you need to put it into context:

While here are many advantages to sourcing our workforce overseas, 'every rose has its thorn' and we should not be blind to the disadvantages...

You have mentioned in a comment that "this shall be a subtitle". As a subtitle can't give sufficient context, don't use a proverb.

  • I agree, however this is my subtitle and I provide much more information directly below it. I just want something that intrigues the reader and entices them to keep reading. – YasG Apr 3 at 19:43
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I would definitely not recommend using "Every rose has it's thorn", especially if you're talking about people. This phrase is usually used to say

Even happy moments in life can be bittersweet.

A similar phrase (although a bit more optimistic) is

Every cloud has a silver lining.

Instead, I would say something like:

Each person has their pros and cons.

Or maybe instead of person say candidate, depending on what your considering these people for. "Pros and Cons" is almost the exact same thing as "Advantages and Disadvantages", but it sounds a bit more idiomatic.

  • To be precise, I am referring to the advantages and disadvantages of recruiting foreigners within a company. Since I am indirectly referring to people, some idioms (such as the happy moments) may not be as fitting. – YasG Apr 3 at 19:30
  • @YasG In that case, I would say you have two options, (to hire them or not to hire them), so "each option has it's pros and cons" would sound natural. – DJMcMayhem Apr 3 at 19:32
  • I did consider using pros/cons, but since this phrase shall be a subtitle, I wanted something that sounded better. – YasG Apr 3 at 19:34
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Everyone has their pros and cons.

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    To be exact, I am referring to the advantages and disadvantages of recruiting foreigners within a company. I did consider using pros/cons, but since this phrase shall be a subtitle, I wanted something that sounded better – YasG Apr 3 at 19:37
  • A link to one of the dictionary entries for "pros and cons" would improve this answer. – Davo Apr 4 at 14:55

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