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Please imagine a big number of journalists have swarmed to the location in which a renowned politician is going to give a speech! An independent journalist has fallen behind and is going to elbow his way through the crowd to reach the nearest position to the speaker (politician). When he is goong forward, he aks the people over and over:

  • Let me through please.

Later, when he takes the report, he is describing the event to a familiar person and says:

  • There was so crowded that I couldn't go through!

I need to discover whether the bold parts sound natural or not!
I doubt if the second part (go through) which is a self-made verb, sounds natural!

I doubt if the verb "pass" is the most natural verb for the second bold part!

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The first sentence is fine, and entirely idiomatic. Oh, except that many people would say you want a comma before the please.

For the second, you want get rather than go.

There's really not much explanation that can be given... I suppose get is used in its sense of achieving something. But from the perspective of a native speaker, it's just that get through is the expression we use in those situations.

Pass would be understood, but it doesn't suggest that there's a barrier of the same sort to be overcome. It suggests simply being permitted or not.

Oh, and you didn't ask about it, but you also want it rather than there at the start of that sentence.

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  • Thabk you very much @SamBC; just in order to make it clearer to me, please let me know, why the verb "pass" would not sound idiomatic here rather than "go through"? I am asking this question because I need to discover whether in spite of my mother language there is a semantic nuance between the two cases of passing and going through or not! In my language when you are going to (go within a crowd) or when you are (overtaking someone), in both situations one uses the same verb!
    – A-friend
    Apr 4, 2019 at 0:21
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    Pass would be understood, but it doesn't suggest that there's a barrier of the same sort to be overcome. It suggests simply being permitted or not.
    – SamBC
    Apr 4, 2019 at 0:24
  • And @SamBC let's suppose there are a couple of people ahead of you in a sidewalk walking forward, that you are going to overtake them, but they have not noticed you behind them! What shall you say then: (Excuse me; may I get through, please) OR (Excuse me; may pass, please)? Which one can be used here?
    – A-friend
    Apr 4, 2019 at 0:28
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    @A-friend "excuse me" would be the usual thing, on it's own. If necessary, adding "could you let me past, please?", or "could I get past, please?". "Let me pass" could be acceptable, but less likely in my experience in Britain. "Let me through" is perfectly natural and not uncommon.
    – SamBC
    Apr 4, 2019 at 0:31

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