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Just get up from here and go sit next to him (while pointing at the person).

Is the use of "from here" natural? A teacher says this to a kid.

  • Did you find that or hear that somewhere? – Lambie Apr 5 '19 at 13:18
  • Our teachers use it all the time. But it sounds a bit unnatural I guess,so I felt like asking @Lambie – It's about English Apr 5 '19 at 13:30
  • Are your teachers native speakers? Why do you use the plural? – Lambie Apr 5 '19 at 13:31
  • "All the teachers". They all use it. No they're not native speakers, that's why I posted this question @Lambie. – It's about English Apr 5 '19 at 13:33
  • So is it ungrammatical in America? @Lambie. It's not used,like Astralbee said in AmE as well? – It's about English Apr 5 '19 at 13:39
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It is more redundant than unnatural. If one person says to another "get up from here" then it logically follows they are both in the same place, so why specify where to get up from?

It is not grammatically incorrect, as you could comfortably say:

It takes 30 minutes to get from here to there.

I feel it stands out as unnatural in your sentence for the reason given.

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  • And what about : "go from here"? Why does it sound unnatural,is it "grammatically wrong" or "redundant"???? – It's about English Apr 5 '19 at 13:31
  • "get up and go sit next to him" (while pointing) would make so much more sense if the teacher is not next to you. – Smock Apr 5 '19 at 15:30
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Here vs There is a matter of proximity.

While the teacher is close to the child as an arm long distance:

Just get up from here and go sit next to him (while pointing at the person).

Example proximity for Here!

While the teacher is far from the child in a distance to be able to point but not able to touch:

Just get up from there and go sit next to him (while pointing at the person).

Example proximity for There!

So it is natural if teacher is close to the child. It is un-natural if child was far away from the teacher.

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Here and there is complicated. It would be used as explained below.

1) Just get up from here and go sit next to him (while pointing at the person).

The teacher would have to be standing next to you to say that.

2) Just get up from there and go sit next to him (while pointing at the person).

The teacher would be at the front of the class, not next to you.

The use of here and there can make or break what people say in terms of being idiomatic.

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  • So does it sound natural??? – It's about English Apr 5 '19 at 14:03
  • @It'saboutEnglish Would I have bothered to do so if it did not sound natural? It requires the teacher to position himself or herself as I have indicated. here/there is what makes the difference. – Lambie Apr 5 '19 at 14:12

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