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Present Perfect is used for actions which happened in the past but have some influence for the present:

I have done it and now I am happy

What is "have done" action? It's something what happened before "I am happy". I am happy but why? Because I have done it. They are connected.

If something happened in the past and doesn't have influence for present, we can say the same in Past SImple:

I did it and now I am happy

What is "did" action? It's something what happened before "I am happy". I am happy but why? It's unknown but the fact of me doing it in the past isn't connected with my happiness now. I am happy because of something else but not "I did it" makes me happy now.

It's clear, it's okay.

The trouble starts with Past Perfect:

I had done it and then I was happy.

What is "Had done" action? It's something what happened before "I was happy". But was it the real reason which I was happy for? Was it the analogy with "I have done"? Or it is an analogy with "I did" when something was earlier and doesn't have influence?

For Present we have two options:

1) Something was in the past and matters now - I have done 2) Something was in the past and doesn't matter now - I did

But we don't have the same system for Past and Future. If it were something like:

1) Something what was before something in the past and didn't matter - I had done

2) Something what was before something in the past and mattered - I had had done

It's just an exmaple of how it could be. So what does Past Perfect mean? It's like something what was before some other action or moment and doesn't have connection with it(=Past Simple) or it was earlier some other action or moment and it has this connection, has this result but only for Past (=Present Perfect)

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    Whilst it's true that Present Perfect (I have done it) usually implies some degree of "relevance" to current time of speaking, this doesn't mean that Simple Past (I did it) implies there's no relevance to the present. The mere fact that your second example I did it and now I am happy presents both assertions in the same sentence strongly implies some connection between the two. Also note that it's quite common for the conjunction and to be used with the implied sense and therefore, so, hence, which is how I'd normally understand that second example. – FumbleFingers Apr 7 at 16:02
  • @FumbleFingers what about Past Perfect? – Michael Azarenko Apr 7 at 16:03
  • There is actually no necessity for the happiness described in any of the sentences to be related to the action that happened in the past. It's likely, but it's not explicitly required. – Jason Bassford Apr 7 at 16:04
  • @JasonBassford okay, but if we say "I have done" it's something what has some influence for the present. Does "I had done" have the same influence for past or it's just something had happened before some other action\moment? – Michael Azarenko Apr 7 at 16:07
  • No, there is no essential correlation between either thing mentioned. It's just an assumption or implication that there is. The verb tense makes no difference. The only way to draw an explicit link is if you say I am X because of Y. – Jason Bassford Apr 7 at 16:21

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