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In Oscar a 1991 American slapstick crime comedy film directed by John Landis, I heard: "Your father just told me".

Here answer was: native speaker often omit, here it is "has" Your father has just told me as we see on this URL: What is correct "Your father just told me" or "Your father has just told me."

My question is: If native speakers often omit, why "Your father just told me" would not be "Your father told me" without "just" too?

Take care, all actors, mather, father, and daughter are together in a scene and daughter knows that "father has just told to her mother" because her mother has just arrived home.

My question is about omitted words in conversation why stop only on "has", why do not omit "just" also and "Your". If a conversation like short sentences, ok, let's go the shortest possible. "Father told me."

  • I'm afraid I don't understand at all. Are you saying that the sentence as spoken, "Your father just told me," is ungrammatical? I think that it's grammatical, and there's no need add any words. (Out of context, it is perhaps ambiguous, but I think I see how you take it.) – Chaim Apr 8 at 16:34
  • I quote: "While the correct construction requires has just told me, native English speakers frequently omit the has from such sentences." this URL: What is correct "Your father just told me" or "Your father has just told me." – b2ok Apr 8 at 16:42
  • In that discussion you quote the words "They (just discover) a new fuel." That seems different to me, and wrong, because "discover" is in the present tense. We could improve it with the words "have discovered" or the word "discovered." – Chaim Apr 8 at 16:50
  • "have discovered" is only correct. Because of that "Your father has just told me" is only correct, but they omit "has" in conversation and I ask, ok, why do not omit "just" also and "Your" and to have "Father told me" because daughter see that it was "just" and that it was her father. – b2ok Apr 8 at 16:54
  • I don't seen any reason, in any of these examples, to consider "have discovered" or "has told me" preferable to the same words minus "have" or "has." So apparently I don't know the answer to your question. – Chaim Apr 8 at 16:56
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"Your father told me" could refer to any time. "Your father just told me" would mean minutes after or very recently.

  • My question is about omitted words in conversation why stop only on "has", why do not omit "just" also. If a conversation like short sentences, ok, let's go the shortest possible. "Father told me." – b2ok Apr 8 at 15:53
  • Because it implies a different meaning and it can't be omitted. – Kaique Apr 8 at 17:23
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Just is an adverb, which has a meaning. In fact, it has two very different meanings depending on context.

As various people have said, in this context it almost certainly means "a moment ago". But in other contexts it can mean "only" (i.e. he told me and nothing else).

In either case, it has meaning, and omitting it will remove that meaning.

Using or not using an adverb has nothing whatever to with the the choice of whether to use the simple past "told" or the present perfect "has told".

In fact, your talk of "omitting 'have'" is misleading and unhelpful. A different verb form has been substituted, which in this case surfaces as "told" vs "has told". But with a different verb it would look like a different change: "spoke to me" vs "has spoken to me". There is no question of "omission", because no English speaker (of any variety, as far as I know) would say "Your father spoken to me".

  • Colin Fine thank you, your answer is awesome! – b2ok Apr 8 at 20:02
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I just saw in library Cambridge's grammar book in which I read in section Difference between American English and UK English that with "just" in UK English go present perfect but in American English go past simple:

UK English = Your father has just told me.

American English = Your father just told me.

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