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Let's suppose someone is making you to go haywire and you're going to get furious. You are about to warn them grinding your teeth regarding your character and say that you have a long fuse and can keep your temper for a long time, but in spite of this ability of mine, I need to warn you that if I get angry, I would get in a very bad way in the manner that I can even harm you etc. I was wondering if you let me know whether the following sentence sounds natural and idiomatic to convey this message:

I usually don't get angry, but if I get, I'd get badly.

I need to know if the usage of the adverb badly sounds natural and idiomatic to you or I have to substitute it with something like very angry etc.

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It does not sound natural. There are two reasons. Here's why:

Get

I usually don't get angry, but if I get

Get needs an object, like I get a ball or I get a job.

This should be

I usually don't get angry, but if I did,

Badly

You don't get angry badly. You can write badly, want something badly, or even have to go to the bathroom badly.

You get very angry, get extremely angry, or get horribly angry.

So...

This is grammatically correct, but still a little weird:

I usually don't get angry, but if I ever did, I'd get extremely angry.

Try:

  • I don't usually get angry, but this makes me very angry.
  • I don't usually get angry, but if anything were to make me angry, this would be it.

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