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I always tend to use constructions like in the examples below. Where I'm mixing "do" and "be" by way similar to that when the "do" and "have" are used together. (e.g. Does it have?). Why it is wrong? How it break the sense of what I want to say by it?

a) Does the feature is still available?

b) Do markets are open?

Thank you.

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    Both of your examples are wrong. It would rather be "Is the feature still available?" and "Are the markets open?". Try putting correct examples so your question can be understood more easily – Bella Swan Apr 3 '19 at 5:04
  • Anyway, if you could do this, you'd need to use the bare infinitive be, so does the feature still be available? and do markets be open? These are still somewhat weird, but they're not as wrong as the example sentences. Consider your analogy with have: we conjugate do, not have, which is why we don't say *does it has? – phoog Sep 26 '20 at 4:29
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You can form sentences that use either do or is, but generally not both at the same time. As a simple rule, pick only one or the other:

✘ Does the feature is still available?

→ ✔ Is the feature still available?
→ ✔ Does the feature still exist?

With the does version, you can't use the word available, so I changed it to something else.

✘ Do markets are open?

→ ✔ Are the markets open [now]?
→ ✔ Do the markets open [at 9:00]?

I added the definite article in front of feature. I also added the words in parentheses to illustrate the different meanings of the two sentences.

  • Shouldn't the fourth word be "questions"? The phrases "do be" and "don't be" are fairly common. – phoog Sep 26 '20 at 4:22
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  • You play the guitar. (do play)

    • Do you play the guitar?
      • What do you do? (play the guitar = do. What, put what at the beginning of the sentence)
  • You have got a camera in your bag. (have got)

    • Have you got a camera in your bag? (put have at the beginning of the sentence)

      • What have you got in your bag.(a camera = what , put **what **at beginning of the sentence)
  • You have a camera in your bag. (do have)

    • Do you have a camera in your bag?(put do at the beginning of the sentence)
      • What do you have in your bag? (a camera = what , put what at the beginning of the sentence)
  • Please take care of the way you use punctuation marks. We do not include two spaces neither before or after a comma, nor a question mark. Also, there is an edit option in the answer you post, no need to delete and write all over again. – Dhanishtha Ghosh Oct 31 '20 at 12:39
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To do and to be never* (see below) mix in the same clause / sentence. Either of them is enough, depending on the context.

Your examples will be OK like this:

a) Is the feature still available?

b) Are the markets open?

If your question must use to be, then to do is no longer needed.

However, if your sentence does not have / does not need to be, then to do is needed:

Do you have some time?

Did you go to the concert?


Additionally,never mix to do with the modal verbs: can / may / must:

Do you can sing?

Can you sing?>

or:

Do I may wait here?

May I wait here?

To form an interrogation with must, then you need to use to have to, and therefore use to do:

Do I must pay?

Do I have to pay?


(*) One exception when "to do" and "to be" fit together in a sentence is when "to do" has the purpose to emphasize the action (in this case, "to be").

As @phoog so cleverly provided an example in the comment:

Do be careful not to mislead anyone.

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    Do be careful not to mislead anyone. – phoog Sep 26 '20 at 4:23
  • @phoog: Very good point, I missed that usage. I updated my answer to include this.Thank you. – virolino Sep 28 '20 at 6:50

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