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Only one or two people have objected that the students will drive too fast.

Why not use would instead of will in the sentence above?

  • Normally one would say, "Only one or two people have objected to them driving too fast." – aparente001 Apr 5 '19 at 4:29
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    Can the person voting down tell me the reason, for I can not ask question in this forum? – Y. zeng Apr 5 '19 at 12:18
  • @aparente001: That's if the students have already been seen driving too fast. (Also, their driving is better than them driving.) – Anton Sherwood Apr 10 '19 at 6:19
  • @AntonSherwood - In my version, we don't know that they actually have been driving too fast. In yours, there is an assumption that they have been. – aparente001 Apr 11 '19 at 2:06
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Practically speaking, either can be used, depending on context. If the discussion is about opening a new freeway near the school, and it's pretty much a "done deal", then it's just a question of whether the students will or won't drive too fast.

But if we're speaking of a proposed law change then it may be implied that the students would drive too fast if the law is passed.

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  • My English is so poor that I can not understand your words well. May you retell me them in a simpler words? – Y. zeng Apr 5 '19 at 12:20
  • @Y.zeng - Please visit our sister site, ELL, English Language Learners. It is better and more helpful for your level. You will like it. (If you were to visit it, you would like it.) – aparente001 Apr 11 '19 at 2:08
  • @aparente001 Thanks very much. – Y. zeng Apr 11 '19 at 3:43
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Because the main clause is expressed in a present tense. Compare:

Only one or two people object that the students will drive too fast (simple present tense)

Only one or two people have objected that the students will drive too fast (present perfect)

Only one or two people objected that the students would drive too fast (simple past tense)

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