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The 4-year-olds often chose to look at the marshmallows while waiting, a strategy that was not terribly effective.

Is "which is" omitted before "a strategy" ( ... waiting, which is a strategy ...)?

I want to know how the noun "a strategy" can be attached to the end of the above sentence?

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I may have misinterpreted your question, but here's my best shot at an answer:

  1. You could put "which is" in front of "a strategy", but it makes the sentence sound a bit less formal (in my opinion). The way it is now is perfectly fine and grammatically correct, whereas if you were to add "which is" it would be a bit clunky, but still okay.

  2. If you wanted to put "a strategy" at the end of the sentence, you could say something like:

The 4-year-olds often chose to look at the marshmallows while waiting, which was an ineffective strategy.

or something along those lines.

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    That’s fine. “He looked at the ball, an object that was round,” is the same as “he looked at the ball, which was an object that was round.” Apr 12, 2019 at 0:35

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