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When I want to confirm some statement, I shall put negative question at the end of the sentence.

"He is tall, is not he?"

How to phrase this idiom with "anyone"?

"Anyone can place an order, cannot anyone?"

sounds ugly to me.

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"He is tall, is not he?"

should be:

"He is tall, isn't he?"

Nobody uses "is not" in this context.


"Anyone can place an order, cannot anyone?"

It sounds (kind of) ugly to me too :)

You can use:

Anyone can place an order, isn't it?

(updated, after nice feedback in the comments. Thank you.)

Anyone can place an order, isn't that so / right / true?

Or:

Anyone can place an order, can't they?

Or (to avoid all confusion):

Anyone can place an order, right?

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    Just my opinion: "Anyone can place an order, isn't it?" is not idiomatic, and does not seem correct. The closest would be "isn't that true?", "isn't that right", or "isn't that so?". Commented Apr 12, 2019 at 9:54
  • I agree that Anyone can place an order, isn't it? should not be used. It's not a good example of good English. Commented Apr 12, 2019 at 13:24
  • Maybe it would work in very informal BrE, as innit can be used after pretty much anything. Anyway, He's tall, is he not? works as an emphatic option, and the same goes for Anyone can place an order, can they not?.
    – user3395
    Commented Apr 12, 2019 at 16:32

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