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I see two pictures where 'since' are used as 'when'

'Since the beginning, it was just the same. The only difference, the crowds are bigger now.'

https://izquotes.com/quote/elvis-presley/since-the-beginning-it-was-just-the-same-the-only-difference-the-crowds-are-bigger-now-148532

'Since my childhood, I saw my elder brothers playing cricket and that is what built my passion around it. I was enrolled in school but all my attention was on cricket.'

https://www.azquotes.com/quote/1563531

  • But "since" doesn't mean "when" in your examples. The expression since X (where X is some identifiable point in the past, such as "the beginning of time" or "my childhood") means from X (in the past) until now. – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Apr 14 '19 at 12:45
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Since does not mean when. It means "over a period of time starting with". That fits both of your examples (though the grammar of the first is possibly slightly non-standard). It usually means that the period of time is continuing to 'now', but in actual usage that is not universal - and not even formally required if it is used in relation to a past perfect verb.

It also means because, but that's not relevant here.

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Since means continuously from a point in time in the past until now

I would recommend a slightly changed wording.

Since the beginning, it has been just the same. The only difference is that the crowds are bigger now.

If you mean ONLY at a point in time, you can use "in"

In the beginning, it was just the same. The only difference is that the crowds are bigger now.

In my childhood, I saw my elder brothers playing cricket and that is what built my passion around it. I was enrolled in school but all my attention was on cricket.'

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  • Or that was normal grammar for his dialect. There is no ultimate authority for what is 'right' in English. – SamBC Apr 14 '19 at 12:48
  • Agreed, he is the King after all! – Eureka Apr 14 '19 at 12:50

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