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Here is the situation: One subject teacher is wrapping up his successful lesson - all kids in the class were listening to him with a lot interest and participated in all activities during the lesson. The homeroom teacher who was present in the classroom during the whole lesson comes up to him and says:

"Very ...!"

Here the homeroom teacher wants to say that the lesson was very interesting and was fun for children. I need only one word, adjective, right after "Very". What would be the best adjective here?

  1. lovely
  2. lively
  3. entertaining
  4. amusing
  5. fun
  6. funny
  7. engaging
  8. interesting
  9. riveting
  10. playful

    or what?

closed as primarily opinion-based by FumbleFingers, Jason Bassford, SamBC, choster, Varun Nair Apr 24 at 13:31

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • All your adjectives have at least slightly different meanings / connotations. How are we supposed to know exactly what the teacher's thinking (and therefore which word best matches his intent)? – FumbleFingers Apr 14 at 14:29
  • "How are we supposed to know exactly what the teacher's thinking (and therefore which word best matches his intent)?" - By reading my question more carefully: "...Here the homeroom teacher wants to say that the lesson was very interesting and was fun for children..." – brilliant Apr 14 at 14:52
  • You yourself have suggested interesting and fun as possible choices, but you've characterized the lesson itself as both of those plus successful. Which word is more important? All of them? Does your particular choice of possible alternatives imply that the lesson was also riveting? Or are you actually asking for whichever single English word comes closest in meaning to all your alternatives at the same time? – FumbleFingers Apr 14 at 15:16
  • @FumbleFingers - "Or are you actually asking for whichever single English word comes closest in meaning to all your alternatives at the same time?" - Yes! Please, don't pay attention to how I have characterized the lesson. Just look at what thought the home room teacher wants to express. She only wants to say that the lesson was interesting and fun. So I only want to see if there is any adjective in English that would convey both of these meanings and be best fit in the presented grammatical structure (that is, in the two-word sentence that starts with "Very" and ends in that adjective). – brilliant Apr 14 at 16:04
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    Omoshiroi has basically two meanings. One is 'interesting', another one is 'funny'. But that's Japanese. I don't know if there's an equivalent single-word English term. – FumbleFingers Apr 14 at 16:44
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None of those words, nor any other single word that I can think of fully and exactly conveys the meaning "that the lesson was very interesting and was fun for children". If the observer wants to fully convey this meaning, a longer statement would be needed.

"entertaining", "amusing", or "fun" don't really convey the "interesting" aspect, and "interesting" doesn't really convey the "fun for the children" aspect. Perhaps "engaging" is the closest of the suggested words.

A longer speech such as:

Very well done! That was both interesting and fun.

conveys the intended meaning fully, but of course the question says that a longer speech is not wanted.

  • again an answer is dowenvoted with no reason, no comment at all. I think this practice should be prohibited. – David Siegel Apr 14 at 22:11
  • I didn't downvote it. I consider this answer fully addressing my request. I gave it +1 and marked it as the best answer. – brilliant Apr 16 at 20:21

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