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  1. I am a vegetarian.
  2. I am a meaterarian.

Is 'meaterarian' the opposite of 'vegetarian'? Do you have proper expressions for people who like eating meat a lot or who eat meat alone?

marked as duplicate by Mari-Lou A, ColleenV Apr 15 at 9:50

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  • It should be spelled "meatarian", there are too many syllables and the letter "r" in your word meaterarian, I doubt it exists in any dictionary! :) – Mari-Lou A Apr 15 at 7:38
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I've not convinced "meatatarian" or any other derivation is a real English word. It certainly is not in the Oxford dictionary. It sounds like a word that has been made up to counter the word "vegetarian", but if such a word existed then it would mean someone who exclusively ate meat (ie a carnivore), just as "vegetarians" exclusively eat vegetation.

If you mean somebody who eats anything, the word you are looking for is "omnivore", although this is really a classification that describes all humans as a species - being a vegetarian is a matter of choice. Informally, most people clarify that they are not vegetarian by simply saying they are a "meat eater".

  • It's the OP's spelling that is off, the term meatarian is attested by Wiktionary and meatatarian has several references online. . – Mari-Lou A Apr 15 at 9:21
  • @Mari-LouA Yes, that is why I said "or any other derivation". I saw the entry in "wiktionary" but a wiki isn't really an authority on "real" words whereas the Oxford Dictionary is respected as such. I also cover that it is a "made-up" word, and I have no problem with such things... they show the flexibility of the English language that you can make up a new word like "un-makeuppable" and natives will know what you mean even though it is complete rubbish. – Astralbee Apr 15 at 10:40
  • Before becoming "real", words and expressions are used by its speakers for a much longer time, even decades when an English editor decides to include it in the OED. Wiktionary is a fine source, it is not without its defects, entries can be vandalised or manipulated but generally speaking, I see this happening less and less. – Mari-Lou A Apr 15 at 11:00

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