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Please which of the following sentences is correct?

"While I study there, I'll look for a job" or "While I'm studying there, I'll look for a job"

I think the second is correct because it has a future meaning with a long action (I'am studying) and a short action happening in the middle of the longer one (I'll look for a job). I think it's a kind of tense simplification (While I'll be studying there, I'll look for a job). Whereas the second is incorrect because of the use of while+present simple which can't refer to a long action in the future. Am i right?

Thank you

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    Welcome to ELL. Which one do you think is the correct way to write it? We can write better answers if we understand a little better why you are having trouble deciding which one is correct. – ColleenV Apr 17 at 17:58
  • I think the second is correct because it has a future meaning with a long action (I'am studying) and a short action happening in the middle of the longer one (I'll look for a job). I think it's a kind of tense simplification (While I'll be studying there, I'll look for a job). Whereas the second is incorrect because of the use of while+present simple which can't refer to a long action in the future. Am i right? – user93212 Apr 19 at 11:34
  • You should edit your question to include that information. That will bump it back to the front page of questions, and you should be more likely to get an answer with more detail. – ColleenV Apr 19 at 12:40
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Both sentences are correct, actually, although your thinking is sound when you say that 'I'll look for a job' is a short action happening in the middle of a longer, future action.

I think you might not be aware of the definition of 'to study' that refers to a long term action.

'Study' can mean the task of learning some information, or spending some time doing the work of learning.

I have to study Spanish tonight.
I studied the whole chapter of that book.

'Study' can also mean to be a student.

She wants to study in London.
After high school I will study at college.

This second meaning refers to a longer term action so it fits your criteria for being a correct usage in this sentence.

When you say that 'while I'm studying there' is a tense simplification of the future I think you are confused. 'I am studying' doesn't mean the same thing as 'I will be studying, so one is not just a simplification of the other.

Your example, 'While I'll be studying there' doesn't mean 'during the time when I will be studying there'. The sentence, 'While I'll be studying there, I'll look for a job.', actually means

Even though I'll be studying there, I'll look for a job.

This article explains the use of the word 'while' better than I can.

  • Thank you for your answer, I really leaned a lot from it. It seems to me that the present simple form of the verb "study" preceded by "while" refers to a routine action. In my opinion "While I study there, I'll look for a job." means quite like "Every time I study there, I'll look for a job?". This confusion clears if "when" is used instead of "while" (When I study there, I'll look for a job) – user93212 Apr 22 at 21:11
  • I'm glad you were able to learn something from the answer and find a way to clear up your own confusion. Just be aware that native English speakers will understand either 'while' or 'when' as meaning the same thing in that context. – dwilli Apr 22 at 22:27

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