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Here the 'something' means a theory or a principle.

My sentence is

While this principle can only be appropriately understood in terms of rigorous theorems (see below for some), it is in agreement with the intuition that to fit a jump or a cusp we need fast oscillating terms.

But I am not so satisfied with the phrasing.

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  • Can you rephrase the question? Or explain it better? This is really unclear.
    – Varun Nair
    Apr 18, 2019 at 13:03
  • Yes. I did. The whole sentence is there now.
    – wdlang
    Apr 18, 2019 at 13:45
  • I have no idea what you're asking. Only the title of the question is understandable—but it's not enough to go on. The sentence is not only confusing, but I don't understand how it relates to the title of the question. Apr 19, 2019 at 5:31
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    I feel that the wording is fine and that intuition is the correct word to use there.
    – Hippolippo
    Apr 29, 2019 at 21:47

2 Answers 2

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"Intuition" is defined as the ability to understand something instinctively, without the need for conscious reasoning.

Given that you are talking about scientific theories and principles, I don't think the "intuition" you refer to is a mere 'feeling' or devoid of "conscious reasoning". I think you are trying to describe an intuition based on experience. As such, there might be a better word or phrase than "intuition".

If you really want to use "intuition", it should really belong to someone, or a group of people. Intuition is something that people possess, not something that is documented, so you should state whose intuition it is, rather than say "the" intuition:

it is in agreement with our intuition that to fit a jump or a cusp we need fast oscillating terms.

Alternatively, if you agree that "intuition" might not be the most appropriate word, perhaps you could instead use "theory" or, even better "working theory". A working theory is based on known facts, not just guesswork or intuition. As a theory is normally documented, you can say "our theory" or "the theory" if you prefer, or if the theory is not yours.

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While this principle can only be appropriately understood in terms of rigorous theorems (see below for some), it is intuitive that to fit a jump or a cusp we need fast oscillating terms.

Or something like "it is intuitively obvious", depending on the circumstances.

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