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"Look into the motives which have induced men, once united by their common needs in a general society, to unite themselves still more intimately by means of civil societies: you will find no other motive than that of assuring the property, life and liberty of each member by the protection of all."

Would anyone please tell me what the following means?, or what does than that of assuring mean?

... than that of assuring the property, life and liberty of each member by the protection of all."

And, Would you possibly elaborate this:assuring the property, life and liberty of each member by the protection of all.

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Can you please give the source?

Your sentence is

You will find no other motive than that of assuring the property, life and liberty of each member by the protection of all.

"that" here stands for "motive". So rewriting the sentence with he replacement of "that" we find

You will find no other motive than the motive of assuring the property, life and liberty of each member by the protection of all.

Here are a few more example sentences which have similar kind of construction -

  1. The language used was simpler and chattier than that of Pravda or even of Trud , the main labor organ.

  2. In Zambia, although it has a population at least ten times smaller than that of Nigeria, localism has also been the prime concern of domestic politics.

Is it fine now?

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  • gmatclub.com/forum/…
    – nima
    Apr 6, 2014 at 6:13
  • Great. Would you possibly elaborate this:assuring the property, life and liberty of each member by the protection of all.
    – nima
    Apr 6, 2014 at 6:16
  • Consider this part - "More motive than the motive of A". Does it make sense? If it does, now consider this - "No other motive than the motive of A". If this does I guess you can understand your sentence. Apr 6, 2014 at 6:17
  • @nima_persian In this kind of construction, "that" implies something that is already mentioned and well understood. I will try to add some more examples in my answer. Apr 6, 2014 at 7:04

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