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Fee: a payment made to a professional person or to a professional or public body in exchange for advice or services.

I mean, I know what a "professional person" is but I can't figure out the meaning of "professional or public body". Also, what's the difference between "a professional body" and "a public body"? Can you give me some examples of both?

Thanks.

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A "body" is a figurative way to say "organization", or "institution".

A "professional body" might be a company or corporation, some kind of agency, or various other privately-run entities with a wide range of purposes. For example, a real-estate agent might have to pay a fee to take a test offered by a local licensing board, or pay yearly dues (a kind of fee) to a representative agency. These entitles are responsible for tracking and training all authorized real-estate agents in that area, or might advocate with the government about laws related to real estate.

Meanwhile a "public body" is usually a government-run entity responsible for administering some particular field. For example, in the United States, each state has its own Department of Motor Vehicles responsible for licensing drivers and registering vehicles. If you own or drive a vehicle, you must pay regular fees for the renewal of official documents.

  • That was awesome. Thanks for the detailed clarification. – Itamar Apr 23 at 16:30
  • a professional body is not a company. – Lambie Apr 23 at 17:05
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a professional body= for example, the AMA, the American Medical Association, the AIA, the American Institute of Architects, any organization representing a trade or profession.

a public body=for example, the Center for Disease Control (in Altanta, Georgia) or NASA. public bodies are generally government entities or independent agencies that work on behalf of the public.

And body just means entity or organized group.

  • Hi, that was great. Thank you so much for making it clear for me. – Itamar Apr 23 at 15:43
  • Yes, I understand it can be confusing given corpo de bombeiros, etc. :) – Lambie Apr 23 at 15:57

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