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I am wondering what is the exact difference between "What is the point" and "What is the purpose" ?
I was answering to a question on an other SE forum and I just told "What is the point of this ?", now I am wondering if isn't sort of "more agressive" than "What is the purpose of this ?"

  • generally, the point is short and precise and purpose, as compared to point will be in detail and explanatory. – Maulik V Apr 7 '14 at 16:23
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    thefreedictionary.com/point. Be careful with the subtle differences between the senses 15, 16, and 17. – Damkerng T. Apr 7 '14 at 17:07
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The answer depends on the context. Both can mean the same and different.

Consider these examples

"We should keep our customer happy. We should provide the best service. We should be ready answering them any time... blah ...blah...blah..."; "Okay, what's the point"; "The point is, we should be a client centric organization.

Think this same topic but now with purpose...

"We should keep our customer happy. We should provide the best service. We should be ready answering them any time... blah ...blah...blah..."; "Okay, what's the purpose"; "The purpose is to focus on our customer service and make them satisfied. That will bring more customers and our sales will double."

As I said, broadly, both point (#7) and purpose mean the same.

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  • Thank you ! It's much more clear now ! I see that you put a comma after "the point is", are we forced to put a comma "after the point is" ? And is it correct to say "The point is that we should be a client centric organization" ? – Trevör Apr 7 '14 at 17:02
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    @TrevörAnneDenise that's an all different question - to put comma or not. In that sentences, that can go without comma as well. I put comma to emphasize a gap. Yes, this is fine - the point is that we should.... – Maulik V Apr 7 '14 at 17:15

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