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Is "one" properly used in the following? Does it have a grammatically correct referent?

You know about addiction to drugs and cigarettes, but here's one you may not be cognizant of: fitness addicts.

I'd appreciate your help.

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In this case, "one" is referring to a type of addiction. However, the sentence is not quite correct for two reasons:

  1. The writer wants to tell the reader about another type of addiction, but using "here's one" makes more grammatical sense if the writer has already listed more than one addiction. Since the first clause of the sentence only says "You know about addiction [singular] to drugs and cigarettes", it should be changed to:

You know about addictions [plural] to drugs and cigarettes

  1. (After editing) the writer lists two types of addictions: addiction to drugs and addiction to cigarettes. Saying "here's one you may not be aware of" is a correct way to introduce a third addiction, but the writer uses the phrase "fitness addicts" (which is not a type of addiction, but a type of addict). The rest of the sentence should be changed to:

but here's one you may not be cognizant of: addiction to fitness.

The complete, grammatically correct sentence will then be:

You know about addictions to drugs and cigarettes, but here's one you may not be cognizant of: addiction to fitness.

In this sentence, "one" correctly refers to an addiction that is not mentioned in the first part of the sentence.

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