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I have read that "will" should not be used with "if" clause in conditional sentences. However, I feel that below sentence is grammatically correct even though "will" is used with "if" clause. Could you please help clarify same along with good explanation.

If you will not do it then I will do it myself

Please note that I want to know from international competitive exams perspective, so I need grammatically correct answer. Also, all good/additional information you may provide with the answer would be highly and sincerely appreciated.

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    I don't understand why some people silently come and down vote questions/answers, without providing any reasons. Down voting is of course acceptable and encouraged but without proper explanation it is despicable. – pjj Apr 24 at 20:54
  • It is grammatical, but it may not mean what you think it means, that is, it's the verb will, willed, will·ing, wills. So you can say if you will, if he wills or *she willed that... *. Btw, not the downvoter. – Lucian Sava Apr 24 at 20:59
  • @LucianSava Thank you for your comment. Even I think that's grammatically correct but I couldn't justify it in context of rule which says that "will" should not be used with "if" clause in conditional sentences... – pjj Apr 24 at 21:19
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You should probably take whatever source told you that you can't use "will" in conditional sentences and throw it away ... well, either that or you misunderstood the limits of the "rule". What about this famous proverb by Francis Bacon, possibly translated from a Turkish saying):

If the mountain will not come to Muhammad, then Muhammad must go to the mountain.

Certainly you can use the simple present as well, but "will" is a standard and common syntax used to make conditional statements about the future.

If John Snow [bends / will bend] the knee to Daenerys Targaryen, then she will make him Warden of the North.

  • Thank you for your reply. You can please provide some proof (online resource/link) which says that both main and sub clause in conditional sentence can have "will", because resource I read (here in India) says it is grammatically incorrect. I agree with your other answer to my question but not this one, unless you could provide me some proof. – pjj May 18 at 19:18

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