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a) Despite civic functionaries claiming that funds have been released, these projects are haven't taken off yet.

https://www.sott.net/article/295199-Attack-by-monkey-claims-womans-life-in-India

b) Our buses are haven't left yet, you can still get the bus.

1) Are above sentences constructions correct?

I mean can we use two two auxiliary i.e. are and havent in one sentence.

2)If Yes then above sentense is in simple or Passive tense?

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  • You are mixing up some terminology— simple and passive are not tenses, and are not mutual variants of any other grammatical concept. Please edit your post to clarify.
    – choster
    Commented Apr 25, 2019 at 15:27

1 Answer 1

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You can have two auxiliary verbs in the same sentence:

They could have gone to a quiet dinner, but they went walking on the beach instead.

but "are haven't" is never grammatical. Pick one or the other, but not both:

The buses haven't left yet, there's still time for you to get on.

The buses are not gone, there's still time for you to get on.

More about auxiliary verbs

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  • Thank Andrew ... What about first example ?
    – user4084
    Commented Apr 25, 2019 at 15:40
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    @user4084 As I said, "are haven't" is never grammatical. Pick one or the other, and modify the sentence accordingly.
    – Andrew
    Commented Apr 25, 2019 at 15:42
  • Sorry but you are giving ambiguous answer. In.first sentence You are saying "are haven't is not grammatical and in next sentence you say that u can pick up are or haven't but not both together. It is confusing me.
    – user4084
    Commented Apr 25, 2019 at 16:52
  • My question is " Are & haven't " and not "Are or haven't".
    – user4084
    Commented Apr 25, 2019 at 16:54
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    @user4084 I don't think my answer is ambiguous, but I can try to make it more clear: Never use "are haven't". It's not grammatical. You can use "are not" or "have not", The projects are not yet successful or The projects have not yet become successful.
    – Andrew
    Commented Apr 25, 2019 at 23:11

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