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I just saw this usage and it confused me a little. Is it a appropriate usage?

I don't need Monty Hall ruining my place of work when Monty Hall has already ruined my home life. (Brooklyn nine nine, tv-series)

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Yes, this is appropriate, at least colloquially.

The use of the word "need" is used to give more emphasis to how disliked the circumstance is in contrast to "want". Compare:

I don't want this happening right now!

I don't need this happening right now!

I really don't need this happening right now!

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    Yep, it's a common construction, e.g. "I don't need you telling me I should ask my boss for more money. I already know I should, but it's not as easy as you think."
    – Andrew
    Apr 27, 2019 at 1:42
  • So can I use this form in different situations? For example : "I need you doing this job?" Apr 27, 2019 at 7:31
  • + I have one more question: Is there a difference in meaning in the following alternatives? "I don't need Monty Hall (to be ruining or ruin) my place of work when Monty Hall has already ruined my home life. " Apr 27, 2019 at 15:14
  • @TalhaÖzden In the first question, I believe "I need you to be doing this job" is arguably more natural, although "I need you doing this job" is also valid and means the same thing. In the second question, similarly, "I don't need Monty Hall ruining" means the same as "I don't need Monty Hall to be ruining". "I don't need Monty Hall ruin" doesn't sound natural, but "I don't need Monty Hall to ruin" sounds fine. The sentence using ruining implies that he is currently in the process of causing ruin. Using to ruin implies that he has not yet ruined anything. Apr 28, 2019 at 2:27

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