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I am not sure about the meaning of the phrase"move-blocking seven of hearts beneath the six" in the following sentence:

You can drop that move-blocking seven of hearts beneath the six, but it doesn't mean that would make the game easier because it would add new layers of complexity.

Maybe I am missing a very technical aspect or rule of cards.

closed as unclear what you're asking by Jason Bassford, James K, Katy, choster, Varun Nair May 2 at 13:31

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    It's impossible to know exactly what it means without knowing what card game is being talked about. All we can say is that the seven of hearts is blocking a move in some way. – Daniel Roseman Apr 28 at 10:26
  • @DanielRoseman The game's name is Solitaire. – curious Apr 28 at 10:45
  • "Solitaire" means any one-player card game. There are many. – Anonymous Apr 28 at 11:31
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    What is the specific part of that phrase (aside from the meaning of each word) that is confusing? – Jason Bassford Apr 28 at 18:55
  • @JasonBassford I am not sure about the process. How does the word "beneath" make sense here? – curious Apr 28 at 18:58
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Without knowing the game, I can't say exactly what it means, but I can explain the grammar.

The structure is "you can drop [that move-blocking seven of hearts] [beneath the six]": it's like "you can drop that seven beneath the six", but with extra modifiers on "seven".

"Move-blocking" modifies "seven": "a move-blocking seven" is a seven that blocks a move. This is the same structure as "a plant-eating animal": an animal that eats plants.

"Beneath the six" isn't part of the noun phrase; it's another argument to drop: it tells where to put the seven.

So apparently this seven is getting in the way of some other move, and it's possible to get rid of it by dropping it beneath the six.

  • The game's name is Solitaire. – curious Apr 28 at 13:38
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The author might have meant to use "move-blocking" as a word. But:

The hyphen is probably a dash.

You wrote:

You can drop that move-blocking seven of hearts beneath the six, but it doesn't mean that would make the game easier because it would add new layers of complexity.

Another possibility here is the following:

You can drop that move -- blocking seven of hearts beneath the six, but it doesn't mean that would make the game easier because it would add new layers of complexity.

It doesn't mean is not very good -- "it" is ambiguous, and it should probably say "that" or be re-written.

The above version means:

You can try that play. You can block the 7 of hearts beneath the 6, but it doesn't mean that would make the game easier because it would add new layers of complexity.

Let's keep simplifying:

You can do that. You can put the 7 of hearts underneath the 6.

But doing that does not mean the game will get easier.

Doing that would add new layers of complexity.

or: That would add new layers of complexity.

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