0

I saw a book is titled "Of human bondage" which was translated into Korean as "인간의 굴레 (bondage of human)" ?"

Does "Of human bondage" mean "bondage of human"?

If so, Is "Of human bondage" the inversion of "bondage of human"? Is the sentence, "Of human bondage" grammatically correct?

1

The title is grammatically correct, but it's not an inversion and it's not a sentence. Titles sometimes begin with "of" or "on", meaning "about": It's equivalent to "About human bondage". (This is old-fashioned, and new books don't often have titles like this.)

"Human bondage" does mean "bondage of humans", which usually means slavery. So the book's title means "[a book] about slavery". But the book is actually a novel, and the "bondage" is metaphorical: it refers to humans being controlled by their emotions.

  • Or it means of bondage of humans . . . (I have no idea why you assume that slavery must be the meaning. That's only one sense of the word.) – Jason Bassford Apr 28 at 18:49
  • @JasonBassford: Ooh, you're right: the book is a novel, and the title refers not to any of the usual senses but to humans being controlled by their emotions! – Anonymous Apr 28 at 19:07

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.