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The sentence is "Can I ride with you because the other car is already full"

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    I would not say that that sentence "ends with a statement": it ends with a reason for the request. The entire sentence is the request, so it ends with a question mark.
    – TrevorD
    Commented Apr 26, 2019 at 23:12
  • Thank you, I appreciate a quick response. So, would any punctuation be added such as a comma after the word "you"?
    – Renee
    Commented Apr 26, 2019 at 23:17
  • When you speak the expression, would you pause (very briefly) before the word "because"? If so, you could put a comma there, but it is far from essential.
    – TrevorD
    Commented Apr 26, 2019 at 23:22
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    It is better grammatically and logically to start with the statement of reason and end with the request : 'Since the other car is already full, may I ride with you ?'
    – Nigel J
    Commented Apr 27, 2019 at 1:40
  • You asked, would any punctuation be added such as a comma after the word "you"? Answer: like many commas, it's optional, and you get to decide. This might help: english.stackexchange.com/q/190093/112436 Commented Apr 28, 2019 at 8:45

2 Answers 2

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Totally depends on the context. If I were writing it as dialogue, I think this way seems the most natural :

"Can I ride with you? ... Because the other car is already full."

Reasoning: assuming you are asking from a perspective of style, and not strictly one of grammar

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    I don't disagree but see no reason for three periods there.
    – Lambie
    Commented Sep 19, 2019 at 17:20
  • In your version, Because is unnecessary and, arguably, grammatically incorrect.
    – JavaLatte
    Commented Oct 14, 2023 at 14:24
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The sentence should end with a question mark.

Can I ride with you because the other car is already full ?

The more natural way of forming that sentence:

Can I ride with you? The other car is already full.

The second sentence would be understood as reason from the context.

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