0

Edit: (I apologize if my question does not make sense. English is not my first language)

Hello, I have just started learning English from online resources and I cannot figure out which sentence is correct:

1st: John was hurt; he knew she only said it to upset him. (uses semi-colon)

2nd: John was hurt, he knew she only said it to upset him. (uses comma)

3rd: John was hurt, but he knew she only said it to upset him. (uses comma and "but")

Thanks

3
  • 1
    Welcome to English Language and Usage. Could you isolate any sentences that you know to be incorrect or suspect might be correct? – rajah9 Apr 29 '19 at 15:53
  • @rajah9 an example of a sentence is given in the question and no I don't have a specific sentence; I was just reading up where to use a commas and punctuation from online resources. i just wanted to know whether this sentence " John was hurt, he knew she only said it to upset him." and it's variations (described in the question) are correct or not – Shashwat Apr 29 '19 at 16:10
  • Thank you for explaining. I wonder if you have seen our sister site, English Language Learners? I'm going to suggest that your question be moved there. – rajah9 Apr 29 '19 at 16:24
0

While the first and the third are grammatical, the second is not.

1st: John was hurt; he knew she only said it to upset him. (uses semi-colon)

This one is correct because both "John was hurt" and "he knew she only said it to upset him" are independent clauses (meaning they may stand independently). Either the semi-colon or a full stop are permitted.

2nd: John was hurt, he knew she only said it to upset him. (uses comma)

The second is not grammatical. It has an error called a "comma splice."

3rd: John was hurt, but he knew she only said it to upset him. (uses comma and "but")

The third one is correct. It uses a coordinating conjunction to combine the two thoughts.

0

1st and 3rd are both much the same. No.2 isn't really normal usage.

Imagine replacing the semi-colon with a full-stop - the sentence still makes sense as two seperate sentences. Alternatively, imagine removing the comma, and the sentence no longer 'flows' correctly.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy