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Do I use a comma or semicolon in the example below?

For your convenience; changes are in red and I’ve also attached your prior comments.

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    Commented May 2, 2019 at 16:02

2 Answers 2

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Use a comma.

For your convenience, changes are in red and I’ve also attached your prior comments.

The use of semicolons in English is extremely rare. When a semicolon is used, it is typically between two main clauses to indicate a pause that is more pronounced than that indicated by a comma.

In this case, "For your convenience," is not a main clause so a semicolon would not be appropriate.

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    The easy way to tell if it's a "main clause" is to try replacing the comma/semicolon with a period to make two separate sentences. If each could stand alone as a sentence, the semicolon should be used instead of a comma. "For your convenience" has no verb, and therefore could not be a sentence. The second use of semicolons is to indicate a higher level of grouping: "red, green, and blue; circle, triangle, and square". Commented May 2, 2019 at 15:38
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For your convenience; changes are in red and I’ve also attached your prior comments.

edit:

For your convenience, I have put changes in red and attached your prior comments.

or:

I have put changes in red and attached your prior comments for your convenience.

It depends on where you wish to place an emphasis. The first is more interlocutor focused. [I would probably say: previous comments]

Generally, pre-positioned adverbial phrases take a comma.

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