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Consider these two self-made sentences below.

  1. Being armed with previous experiences, I decided to check the map at every crossroad.
  2. Armed with previous experiences, I decided to check the map at every crossroad.

My interpretation

I think inserting "being" before the past participle just adds a sense of momentariness to the participle clause. I mean it gives a sense of being a continuous action at the moment. I am confused about the difference between the two :(

Would you tell me what is the difference?


I've also checked the Q&A Past participle vs being+past participle, but I cannot come up with a solid answer about my question after reading the long answer there.

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  • 1
    The issue is equipped with experience. The better word here is: armed with experience....
    – Lambie
    May 2, 2019 at 16:48
  • There is no such thing as a "pas participle." May 3, 2019 at 17:41

1 Answer 1

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The issue is equipped with experience. The better word here is: armed with experience. Also: at every crossroad.

Armed with experience, I [whatever].

Being armed with experience, I [whatever].

Both are fine. Both imply: As I was armed with experience, I [whatever].

You don't really need the being.

Also, check the map "at the crossroads" does imply stopping at crossroads to check it.

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  • I fixed those issues about "on" and "arm". Would you tell me if there's any difference between using "being + past participle" and just using "past participle" in such sentences?
    – Cardinal
    May 2, 2019 at 16:55
  • If there were a difference, I would have said it.
    – Lambie
    May 2, 2019 at 16:56

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