1

Which is more accurate

"This was the context of multiple questions I asked since I started working here."

Or

"This was the context of multiple questions I have asked since I started working here."

I've been taught at school to always use the present perfect with "since", but the first sentence makes more sense to me. Thoughts?

1
  • There is nothing wrong with either version. – Jason Bassford May 3 '19 at 17:29
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The most usual would be to match the "questions I have asked" with the period "since I started working here". As the working is continuing, so might be the asking.

  • "This was the context of multiple questions I have asked since I started working here."

However there's nothing wrong with the alternative.

If the period is finished:

  • Things he did when he was a child. (of anyone, alive or dead, who is no longer a child)
  • Things Mozart did during his lifetime. (Person no longer living)

But

  • Things my brother has done during his lifetime. (Person still living)
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  • What if I'm no longer asking question, or generally not doing the action that precedes "Since"? Do I use the past simple then? – user94858 May 2 '19 at 22:33
  • To my mostly UK ears they sound almost identical. – jonathanjo May 2 '19 at 22:35
-1

I would opt unhesitatingly for the present perfect in nearly all sentences starting with since (when it is not used to mean for this reason).

Its usage nearly always covers a period from a point in the past up to the present, which is exactly what the present perfect signifies.

But your examples raise a question. If something has provoked questions since you started working there, the obvious constructions are either:

This has been the context of multiple questions I have asked since I started working here.
or
This is the context of multiple questions I have asked since I started working here.

If by was the context you mean that it is no longer the context, you might say:

This was the context of multiple questions I asked after I started working here.

This would indicate that it is no longer the context and the issue no longer bothers you.

I would add that the BBC appears to adopted a policy of using the past tense in its news bulletins in contexts where the present perfect is called for - and it never fails to jar on my ears.

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