1

You did not know this and how it work.

Is the above sentence grammatical?

As per my understanding, it should be

You did not know this and how it works

Breaking it into two sentences we will get

1.You did not know this.

2.You did not know how it works.

Initially I would've disregarded it as a mistake, had it not been used by an English teacher. I became unsure and thought there might be something I am missing.

Lastly, would there be any difference if I substitute and with or?

  • Is there a particular reason you are asking this when it's so obvious? You can use the present works or past worked. – Lambie May 3 at 18:17
  • Perhaps initially I would've disregarded it as a mistake, had it not been used by an English teacher. I became unsure and thought there might be something I am missing – eefar May 3 at 18:38
  • It was probably a typo or truncation. – Lambie May 3 at 19:33
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    Please don't leave out important details when framing a question like this. When you ask such an obvious question, we are left scratching our heads trying to figure out why. When you tell us that you are confused because it was from an English teacher, it suddenly makes sense. – J.R. May 3 at 21:16
  • I will surely remember in the future. One quick query, omitting the and -"You did not know how it works/work" still the same rule applies? – eefar May 4 at 6:13
2

All in all the sentence is weird, but for "it" (singular) you need "works"

For the rest of the sentence: It might help with more context of what this is referencing and what it is referencing.

So for example, suppose I have an electronic device that operates on 120 voltage and I take it to Europe and plug it in directly to a 240 volt outlet.

When it breaks someone might say, "You cannot plug a 120 device into a 240 outlet" You might respond, "I don't know anything about voltages" Their response might be, "You did not know this nor how it works" where "this" is the statement about the voltage issue and it is the electronic device.

However, it is still clunky. This and it being effectively being two pronouns in the same sentence makes it hard to decipher which is what.

If I was to say: "You did not know this computer" "You did not know how this computer works" Then I could say: "You did not know this computer or how it works" --I prefer nor and I think nor is proper in negated sentences - but or is understandable.

  • This is a good answer but I think it would be helpful to offer an example of a sentence that means more or less the same thing but is not "clunky". – Andrew May 3 at 19:41

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