1

I am trying to shorten the following sentence:

When the mirror is rotating at a large angle, the mirror reflects the light away from the lenses.

into:

The mirror diverges the light from the lenses when rotating at large angle.

Does the new sentence have the same meaning ? My concern is: does the clause 'rotating' explain the mirror or would it inadvertently refer to the lenses ?

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    The second sentence is fine, except for the use of diverge: it isn't transitive, and its meaning is quite different from reflect. (When talking about optics, it usually means what a divergent lens does.) You probably want "The mirror reflects the light away from the lenses when rotating at large angle." – Anonymous May 4 at 13:01
  • Thanks for the comment. I check the dictionary for diverge, it has two forms: intransitive and transitive, the latter is synonymous to deflect. So diverge is ok. – Karsun May 4 at 14:42
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    Transitive diverge is so rare that most native speakers won't recognize it. If you mean deflect, that's a better word, but reflect away is even better. – Anonymous May 4 at 14:47
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Your second example is confusing from the exact cause you suspected.

You can do it this way:

When the mirror is rotating at a large angle, it reflects the light away from the lenses.

or

The mirror rotating at large angle diverges the light from the lenses.

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