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A reporter interrupted the broadcast with a hot flash from Washington.

Does hot flash/hot flahses mean news? I searched dictionaries, but all the definitions are related to medical condition.

  • Where did you find this line? – Eddie Kal May 5 '19 at 17:52
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I disagree with Jason - I don't think it's a mistake.

Jason mentions the phrase news flash for a report on an important piece of news, but the word flash by itself also has this same meaning (Collins, definition 19). If the text were just a flash from Washington, the meaning would be clear.

Then, the adjective hot, in the context of news, means news that is particularly fresh and worthy of attention. (Collins, definition 6; definitions 5 and 7 are closely related). So your quoted text just combines those to emphasize that the news report is extremely recent and important.

It's true that the phrase hot flash can also refer to a medical condition associated with menopause, but that is just a coincidence; it's not the meaning that's intended here. (Unless it's an intentional joke.) However, because of this double meaning, it's probably not a good idea to use this particular phrase for an important piece of news.

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No. (If you are quoting something, a mistake was made.)

A hot flash is a medical condition most commonly experienced by women:

[Merriam-Webster]
: a sudden brief flushing and sensation of heat caused by dilation of skin capillaries usually associated with menopausal endocrine imbalance
— called also hot flush

// The most common side effects include hot flashes, joint and muscle pain, and bone thinning, the ACS says.
// — Korin Miller, SELF, "What Are My Options for Ovarian Cancer Treatment?," 13 Dec. 2018


The word for a news bulletin is a news flash:

[Merriam-Webster]
: a report on an important piece of news that is given in the middle of another television or radio show —often used ironically when one is saying something that is not new or surprising
// News flash! Your brother's late again!

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