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I created this sentence intuitively and now wonder whether it is proper use of "both".

Since these shows are gaining a lot of popularity, many arguments, both for and against this kind of entertainment, have been made.

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There is nothing wrong with the use of the commas. They serve to indicate nonrestrictive information in the sentence.


The sentence, without the information, would still make sense:

Since these shows are gaining a lot of popularity, many arguments, both for and against this kind of entertainment, have been made.

The commas serve the same purpose as would a pair of actual parentheses:

Since these shows are gaining a lot of popularity, many arguments (both for and against this kind of entertainment) have been made.


If you added both because you used commas, you were correct to do so. Without the commas, the use of both is awkward, and it's better to remove it:

Since these shows are gaining a lot of popularity, many arguments for and against this kind of entertainment have been made.

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