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My sentence:

It is a great chance for every talented child to demonstrate his skills; the chance which previous generations could have only dreamed of.

I wonder not only whether the bold part is right, but also about possible alternatives:

the chance of which previous generations could have only dreamed.

the chance which previous generations could have only dreamed about.

the chance about which previous generations could have only dreamed.

Besides, is the semicolon in the sentence used correctly?

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No, the semi-colon is not correct as it separates a sentence (first part) from a clause (the second). What you require is a comma to separate them.

I would prefer a chance to the chance. It reads more naturally.

Take your choice between dreamed of and dreamed about. Both are idiomatic but could only have dreamed of/about flows better than could have only dreamed of.

About which previous generations could only have dreamed is a bit formal and not a construction that most people would use naturally although perfectly correct.

The quibble you might get is regarding the use of the personal adjective his in reference to child. Fifty years ago nobody would have noticed. These days the gender generation prefer their skills to avoid assuming that the child should be male. Or you can opt for the his or her formula. This has nothing to do with grammar and everything to do with political correctness.

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