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In fairness, though, investors couldn't have found adequate shelter in the yuan even had they wanted to. Despite all the hype about the yuan's growing stature, the universe of yuan assets in which global funds can invest is minuscule. And size matters when it comes to measuring the importance of international currencies.

Can the sentence in bold be parsed in the following:

In fairness, though, investors couldn't have found adequate shelter in the yuan even had they wanted to. = In fairness, though, investors couldn't have found adequate shelter in the yuan even if they had wanted to.

But I don't know the meaning of it. This article is from: enter link description here

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    Yes, had is the past subjunctive as used in a hypothetical (= not real) conditional clause. We normally use if + past subjunctive for hypothetical conditional clauses, but in certain circumstances we can leave out if. The main clause, with couldn't, could also be said to be in the past subjunctive; however, because only a fixed number of (modal) verbs are normally used in the main clause to an hypothetical condition, we usually just say "it is could" rather than "it is the past subjunctive of can", even though this is probably the origin of could/would/should/might there. – Cerberus Apr 10 '14 at 4:27
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    @Cerberus Don't you want to turn that comment into an answer? – Helix Quar Apr 10 '14 at 4:44
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You're spot on. Let me give another example so my answer looks better to get me more votes:

Had I been there on time, I'd be dead. (Gotta love depressing examples.)

This is identical in meaning to:

If I had been there on time, I'd be dead.

It's a strange pattern of words and letters and difficult to deduce a meaning from. In general, I wouldn't recommend dropping the 'if' as it normally makes a sentence much clearer.

One more example:

Were I rich man, I'd yubby dibby dibby dibby dibby dibby dibby dum.

If I were a rich man, yubby dibby dibby dibby dibby dibby dibby dum.

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