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I have had a look on the definitions of these three similar words in dictionaries, but unfortunately I cannot differentiate between them! For more clarification I have provided you with a sentence using them where I cannot distinguish their meanings:

  • He held a concert in aid of the earthquake-stricken people.
  • He held a concert for earthquake-stricken people relief.
  • He held a concert in order to help earthquake-stricken people.

‎ Or

  • He gets around with the aid of a walking stick.
  • He gets around with the help of a walking stick.

As another example I don't know what to say in the following sentence to sound natural:

  • I hope I can do that with your help / with your aid / etc.

The only think that strikes me is that:

  • Aid and relief --- are more about the situation that someone is in need while help can be used in any circumstance.

Please let me know about them.
Added:
some other structures that I'm not sure which one sounds natural:

  • She went to the aid of a man trapped in his car.
  • She went to the help of a man trapped in his car.
    She went to assist a man trapped in his car.
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You are right that all three of these words are related - but I would say help and aid are closer in meaning to each other (see also: assist) while relieve (or relief) means something more like "remove something that causes suffering".

If there's a concert for earthquake victims ("earthquake-stricken people" is an unnatural phrase), the goal is probably to raise money. You can phrase the sentence like:

He held a concert to raise money for earthquake victims.

He held a concert to benefit earthquake victims.

He held a concert to benefit the earthquake relief effort.

To address your other sentences:

He gets around with the aid of a walking stick.

This is fine.

He gets around with the help of a walking stick.

This is also fine. (again, relief is different from help and aid and would not work here.)

I hope I can do that with your help / with your aid / etc.

aid as a noun sounds a little awkward to me in this context. help or assistance would sound best.

  • Thank you @Mixolydian for the informative post on this thread. Just first of all I needed your permission to add a part at the end, while we are discussing the relevant topic here it seems it would be of more help later. Then I know about raising money, but I neede to know how can I use help od aid in that case. – A-friend May 7 at 14:35
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    Per this NGram, with the aid of a walking stick has always been more common than with the help of a walking stick (and as you point out, nobody ever says with the relief of a walking stick). – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica May 7 at 14:41
  • @A-friend you don't need my permission for anything! Since you added those other three sentences at the end of your post - "to assist" is fine. "to the aid of" and "to the help of" - no. Just "to help" or "to aid" in this context. In terms of holding a concert - it sounds more natural to me to be specific about how the concert will help those people, which is by raising money (even if that's obvious). – Mixolydian May 7 at 15:32

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