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Having a look on dictionaries, the following sentences can be made, but I don't know whether they are natural using each verb or not. Please have a look on them and let me know whether there is a way to discover where shall I use each verb or at least make me aware about the unnatural cases in each group so that I could summarize it and come to a conclusion based on the incorrect cases:

1-1- They're going to help people with creating one million job opportunities.
1-2- They're going to aid people with creating one million job opportunities.
1-3- They're going to assist people with creating one million job opportunities.
1-4- They're going to give people a hand with creating one million job opportunities.

Or

2-1- Technology can help disabled people.
2-2- Technology can aid disabled people.
2-3- Technology can assist disabled people.
2-4- Technology can give a hand to disabled people.

Or

3-1- An additional team was hired to help us in this process.
3-2- An additional team was hired to aid us in this process.
3-3- An additional team was hired to assist us in this process.
3-4- An additional team was hired to give us a hand in with this process.

Or

4-1- My dad said he would help me with the costs of buying the apartment.
4-2- My dad said he would aid me with the costs of buying the apartment.
4-3- My dad said he would assist me with the costs of buying the apartment.
4-4- My dad said he would give me a hand with the costs of buying the apartment.

OR

5-1- Nothing can help her now.
5-2- Nothing can aid her now.
5-3- Nothing can assist her now.
5-4- Nothing can give her a hand now.

Or

6-1 That medicine didn't seem to help.
6-2- That medicine didn't seem to aid.
6-3- That medicine didn't seem to assist.
6-4- That medicine didn't seem to give a hand.

Or

7-1- Avoiding fatty foods can help you to bring down your blood pressure.
7-2- Avoiding fatty foods can aid you to bring down your blood pressure.
7-3- Avoiding fatty foods can assist you to bring down your blood pressure.
7-4- Avoiding fatty foods can give you a hand to bring down your blood pressure.

closed as too broad by Lambie, Katy, shin, choster, Lamplighter May 12 at 14:14

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • This question is way too broad and you have posted too many sentences. For your information, only people can give a hand to someone else. – Lambie May 7 at 18:53
  • You're right @Lambie and thank you very much for pointing that out! But believe me, each case can be said for a non-native and there is no way out but asking a true master or an educated native speaker who's able to provide a learner with some justifiable reasons. Thank you again. – A-friend May 7 at 19:27
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The various 1-N sentencesa are all saying something which i don't think you mean. If the meaning is that one million jobs will be created, and this will help/aid/assit people, then it should be:

They're going to help people by creating one million job opportunities.

or better

They're going to help people by creating one million jobs.

"aid" or "assit" could be used in place of 'help'. In 1-4, "people" should not be used twice in the sentence. Say either

They're going to give people a hand by creating one million job opportunities.

or

By creating one million job opportunities, they're going to give people a hand.

The "with" form would mean that the "people" are going to create the jobs, but "they" will assist in this process. SoL

They're going to help people with creating one million job opportunities.

means

People will create one million job opportunities, and they will help people do that.

I doubt this is meant.

2-1 thru 2-3 are all fine. 2-4 repeats "hand" when it should not. Either

Technology can give a hand to disabled people.

or

Technology can give disabled people a hand.

is fine. While it is true that "technology" doies not literally have any hands to extend in assistance, "lend a hand" and "give a hand" are very common metaphors, indeed idioms, meaning simply "assist" or "help", and can be used, in my view, regardless of who or what is doing the helping. You might call it a personification, but a rather mild one.

4-4 has a similar problem. One can say "give me a hand" or "give a hand to me" but not "give me a hand to me".

5-4 is not wrong, but seems more awkward than any of the other 5-x choices.

6-1 is ok. In the other 6-x chh=oices, one should specify who or what is being helped to make things flow better:

  • That medicine didn't seem to aid her
  • That medicine didn't seem to assist with her illness
  • That medicine didn't seem to lend a hand with his blood pressure.

In all of these I think "help" is simplest and best.

  • Thank you very much @David Siegel for spendig this much time to answer my long question. I know somehow how much responding to such questiona can be boring to natives because of the many details they contain. Also thank you for pointing out the typos; I've already corrected them. :) According to your post, I found out that aside from a couple of sentences (including "give sb a hand") and some items with redundant words, all the sentences are natural and idiomatic and this is just a matter of personal prefenece to go for each one. Also, best items are the ones using "help"; do you confirm? – A-friend May 7 at 20:53
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    +1 for: "help" is the simplest and best. I think that's true for every one of the example sets. This question may be lengthy, but I think it does a good job of illustrating how you can't always just substitute a word with one of its synonyms and have the resulting sentence sound as idiomatic as it did before. – J.R. May 7 at 20:59
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    @A-friend I think that, at least in the examples provided, the forms using "help" will be better choices, unless there is some reason in the larger context to choose otherwise, but this is in most of the cases a matter of style."Nothing can assist her now. " seems almost ironic and a poor choice unless irony is intended. – David Siegel May 7 at 22:23
1

There's such a small difference in meaning between these that it's difficult to answer your question. Sometimes one will sound better than the others in the given context.

Some notes:

  • "Aid" probably has the widest range of extremity. You can "aid" someone by picking something off the floor for them, or by driving them to the hospital, or by rescuing them from falling off a cliff.

  • "Assist" is generally used for less severe situations than "help" or "aid". You may assist an old lady crossing the street, but not someone choking to death. That being said, someone modest might downplay their role in a rescue by saying something like:

    I may have assisted in some small way.

  • "Lend a hand" only works for things that have hands. Medicine doesn't lend a hand, nor does technology -- unless you are specifically talking about prosthetics, in which case you may literally be doing just that. This is, of course, an old prosthetics joke:

    Here, let me give you a hand. Get it?

(Edit) Naturally, as with most things in any language, "lend a hand" can refer to metaphorical or implied "hands". Something like a scholarship fund can "lend a hand" because it's managed by people who, ostensibly, have hands. Otherwise metaphors work best when properly framed -- for example, if you want to say that medicine "lends a hand", you ought to do something like create the image of pills with arms.

  • Thank you @Andrew for being of help. As you mentioned "Sometimes one will sound better than the others in the given context." it strikes me that all of these sentences are idiomatic and matural, just acoording to personal style every one can chose a specific way to describe the same thing from among the items provided within my list. Do you confirm my taking? – A-friend May 7 at 19:33
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    @A-friend No, I've listed some examples of where your sentences sound odd. Medicine has no "hands" to "lend", for example, and "assist" seems too mild for "Nothing can assist her now". You've written too many examples for me to evaluate each in detail, so I'd rather stick with general usage. – Andrew May 7 at 19:37
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    "'Lend a hand' only works for things that have hands." I strongly disagree. I think this is an idiom that can be used for any subject, as I say in my answer. "I am glad that the scholarship fund was able to lend a hand so that she could fulfill her potential" seems perfectly natural to me. Call it a mild personification if you like. – David Siegel May 7 at 22:18

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