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The idiom "the other way round" can be used for claiming that the opposite of what just has been said is true. For example:

I always thought that rugby was a rougher game than football, but in fact it’s the other way round.

In the following usage of "the other way round", simply, what is the opposite of what?

I = Interviewer P = Professor

I: On today’s programme, we’re going to talk about women’s films, and here to talk to us is Janet Shaw, professor of Media Studies at Midland University.

P: Hello.

I: First of all, Professor Shaw, what ARE women’s films? Are they all about romance and relationships?

P: Well, they aren’t just one kind of film, in fact, there are lots of different kinds of women’s films. Yes, a lot of them are about romance and relationships. Women’s films focus more on the people and dialogue, and men’s films often focus more on the action.

I: So action films are men’s films.

P: Well, not necessarily. Some women’s films are action films too – but they take a women’s point of view, and the main characters are often women – characters that female audience can identify with. For example, there was the film Thelma and Louise, about two female criminals, or the science fiction film Alien, with Sigourney Weaver.

I: Ah. Are the main characters always female?

P: No – a lot of women’s film have lead actors like Nicolas Cage or Hugh Grant or Mel Gibson – male actors who a lot of women find attractive.

I: Uh huh. Are women’s films actually made for women? I mean, do the film makers sit down and say ‘We’re going to make a women’s film here’?

P: Yes, they often make a story which they think women will like. But often it’s the other way round. For example films from classic literature, such as Pride and Prejudice – these could be called women’s films.

I: Because they focus on characters …

P: Yes, characters and relationships – more dialogue, less action.

I: OK, and finally – do women watch only women’s films?

P: No – that would be impossible! There are far fewer women’s films than men’s films, so women have to watch men’s films, too. And of course, people aren’t just stereotypes. There are a lot of men who like women’s film. And a lot of women who actually prefer men’s films.

I: OK … and what about you?

P: Ooh, now that’s a difficult question! Actually, I prefer reading books!

I: Ah ha, yes, I see. OK, well, thank you very much for joining us today.

P: You’re welcome.

I: Goodbye.

-From a transcription in Headway-Intermediate

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I: Uh huh. Are women’s films actually made for women? I mean, do the film makers sit down and say ‘We’re going to make a women’s film here’?

P: Yes, they often make a story which they think women will like. But often it’s the other way round. For example films from classic literature, such as Pride and Prejudice – these could be called women’s films.

The other way (a)round means “reversed” - when there are two things that each behave in a certain way, they switch places.

I think in this context the original idea is “they write a story and hope it can become a movie that appeals to women”. In contrast, “the other way around” would be “they take a story that they know appeals to women (e.g. Pride and Prejudice) and make a movie out of it.” So in the first case they try to come up with something original that women might like, and in the second case they take a known women’s story and try to come up with a movie after having already established that women like this story. I think the phrase “the other way (a)round” is used somewhat loosely here but this is the gist.

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I think the idiom is misused here, because the professor is not actually contrasting too opposites. She (or he) says that filmmakers often set out to write films for women, by casting certain actors or focusing on certain themes. But it's actually stories from classical literature that women end up liking.

The problem is that stories like "Pride and Prejudice" are classified as "romantic literature", a subject that has been popular with women long before cinema. It seems strange that the professor would claim that this is somehow the opposite of any other "romantic" film with more or less the same underlying themes.

In the end it's not really important. You understand the meaning of the expression, even when the expression doesn't fit the context.

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