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Television is not only for entertainment but also it is a useful as an educational tool. This is because students can watch lectures and educational programs on television. Furthermore, watching a lecture on television can save the time required to travel to the location where the lecture is taking place.

This is the choice of a native English speaker, but I think it is wrong because there is no need to use future structure "is taking place".

Is there a problem in the following choices?

  • (A) save the time required to travel to the lecture's location.
  • (B) save the time required to travel to the lecture's place.
  • (C) save the time required to travel to the location where the lecture takes place.
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In the example:

Furthermore, watching a lecture on television can save the time required to travel to the location where the lecture is taking place.

"is taking place" can be either present or future, it refers to whatever time the lecture occurs, and that is generic in this case. It is a perfectly grammatical form. It is not wrong. Other forms could be used:

  • ... the time required to travel to the lecture's location.
  • ... the time required to travel to the location of the lecture.
  • ... the time required to travel to the place where the lecture is held. (or will be held)
  • ... the time required to travel to the location where the lecture takes place. (or will take place)

However, the form "the lecture's place" sounds odd to me. I can't specify any rule that it breaks. But I would avoid it.

The above forms have no significant difference in meaning.

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    You are right, "the lecture's place" is not natural for most native English speakers.
    – Costa
    May 10, 2019 at 18:38

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