1

Here is the context.

UH OH PISKETTI-OH, Donald Trump, that was not your plan, was it?

Is it a idiom or just a random exclamation without any special meaning?

I see it in this article. Hero Obama Judge will see Dumbass Trump Lawsuit Next Tuesday

  • Also uh-oh spaghetti-o's and other variants. Apparently just a meaningless "exclamation" made up of quirky and/or repeated elements (cf Fiddlesticks!, Botheration!, etc., and "minced oaths" such as spitting out Oh sugar! instead of Oh shit!). – FumbleFingers May 12 at 17:33
4

It's a play on the expression "Uh oh, SpaghettiOs," which comes from a commercial for the canned pasta.

Essentially, it just means "Oops!".

From the Urban Dictionary:

An expression of regret over a goof: oops. From a 1970s TV commercial for Franco-American SpaghettiOs, a canned pasta dinner sometimes with meatballs or sliced frankfurters. Another Homer Simpson quote.


Here, pisketti is just a variation of pasghetti, which is, itself, a simplified pronunciation of spaghetti. Children will often mispronounce the actual word so that it sounds like this.

  • +1 If you watch the video, at the very start the young girl actually says "Here come the pisghetti-os!". – Andrew May 12 at 17:30
  • Is "sk" any simpler than "sp"? Surely just a spoonerism? – jonathanjo May 13 at 15:24
  • @jonathanjo It is easier to pronounce sk than sp, but it's the first two letters that make the change. It's much easier to pronounce pa than sp. The rest of the word follows how it starts. – Jason Bassford Supports Monica May 13 at 15:29
  • @jonathanjo It is easier to pronounce sk than sp, but it's the first two letters that make the change. It's much easier to pronounce pa than sp. The rest of the word follows how it starts. – Jason Bassford Supports Monica May 13 at 15:29
3

Thre are multiple allusions here, which can be confusing. According to Wikidiff (and other sites) pasketti is a comm on childish mispronunciation of spaghetti. But what does spaghetti have to do with it, one might ask? Well, several decades ago, there was a popular and long-running series of TV advertisements with the tag-line "Uh-oh Spaghetti-Os". These generally showed a child with his or her face smeared with Spaghetti-Os (a canned food product with small circular pasta in tomato sauce). The phrase became popular, being used to indicate some small but urgent problem.

By using this line, and combining it with a childish error for spaghetti , I suspect that the writer is trying to suggest that Trump's actions here are both childish, and likely try to create a mess that someone else will have to clean up. But it is a somewhat obscure allusion for anyone who does not remember the ad campaign involved.

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