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I have seen both being used. But I don't know when to use which one.

1- You have done a good job on this (Context: Your teacher saying this after he examines your homework)

1a- You have done a good job in this

2- He did a good job on stealing the ball. (Context: Commentor saying this during a basketball game.)

2a- He did a good job in stealing the ball.

3- I think I did a good job on it (Context: You are saying this after have finished writing a code.)

3a- I think I did a good job in it

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    I can think of some contrived examples where in might work ("How well did he do when in the box?" "I think he did a good job when in it."), but they are contrived. So, while not actually ungrammatical, the use of that preposition is unlikely in most situations. On the other hand, I would expect with to be used at least as often as on in many contexts. (While in would be quite uncommon.) – Jason Bassford Supports Monica May 13 '19 at 4:04
  • For example: "You did a good job in answering my question". – Talha Özden May 13 '19 at 9:06
  • You did a good job in answering my question doesn't sound entirely natural to me—although, it's not outright wrong. – Jason Bassford Supports Monica May 13 '19 at 13:51
  • So using "on" in the all examples above is right and natural to you? And are you a AmE speaker or BE speaker? – Talha Özden May 13 '19 at 14:02
  • As I said in my first comment, on sounds fine, as does with in some of the sentences. Both sound more natural to me than in. – Jason Bassford Supports Monica May 13 '19 at 14:07
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I have never seen "do a good job in", and it reads like a mistake to me.

  • For example: "You did a good job in answering my question". – Talha Özden May 13 '19 at 9:06
  • I have never seen that usage. I would know what you mean, but think it was strange. – Len May 14 '19 at 8:25
  • Folks, if you're going to downvote then please provide feedback. I'm a native speaker, and I have never seen "do a good job in". – Len Jul 22 '19 at 3:52

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