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The phrasal verb get somebody out means: "to help someone escape from or leave a place." I hvae heard get someone "away" is used in this sense too, but I couldn't find any reliable dictionary which approves that. I need to make sure whether they are interchangeable or not. Please have a look on my example below and let me know whether thay can be substituted for each other in this context or not:

  • Dugging a tunnel under the wall, they got five other prisoners out of the prison.

  • Dugging a tunnel under the wall, they got five other prisoners away from the prison.

Are these two sentences mean the same thing?

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The two sentences do not mean exactly the same thing, no. Those positional prepositions mean two different things; you get "out of" something if you are no longer inside of it, and you are "away from" something if you are no longer near to it.

In the sense of helping someone "get away" (or make a "getaway") it still means distance.

If the prisoners dug a tunnel under the wall, but were captured immediately on the other side, you would say that they got out of the prison but they did not get away.

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