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Perhaps nowadays it is our demure contemplation of the Imperfect that the West and the East can meet in mutual consolation.

Source

It doesn't make any sense.

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    This question appears to be off-topic because as the OP himself notes, "It doesn't make sense". There is no point in asking us to "analyse" such an invalid sentence. – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Apr 11 '14 at 19:29
  • As Cees Timmerman suggests below, this is certainly an error, but it is present in the original. You may prefer to read the work in that form, which is much handsomer. – StoneyB on hiatus Apr 12 '14 at 0:04
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Yes, it should be "through our demure..."

Because "our demure contemplation of the Imperfect" isn't something that's meetable.

  • How can the East and the West meet "through our demure contemplation"? – Nico Apr 11 '14 at 13:50
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    By sharing an activity. – Cees Timmerman Apr 11 '14 at 14:22
  • @user4550 perhaps both :) – Nico Apr 11 '14 at 15:02
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At first, I thought this sentence was an example of it-cleft, but the resulting sentence after removing the clefting makes no sense:

That the West and the East can meet in mutual consolation is our demure contemplation of the Imperfect

I cannot imagine how a meeting of the East and the West can be a contemplation.

This makes me think that a portion of the sentence has been omitted, for example:

Perhaps nowadays it is our demure contemplation of the Imperfect [that explains] that the West and the East can meet in mutual consolation.

  • I'm not a native speaker and I don't think it's ungrammatical. Omitting words from a clause is known as ellipsis. See here. – Nico Apr 11 '14 at 14:18
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    I don't think you are right on the reasoning. It's simply ungrammatical as the OP said there. For an ellipsis, it's gone a bit too far. – user2492 Apr 11 '14 at 14:25

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