0

I am going crazy. I have confusion about where to use only, even, just, etc.

I have two sentences,

  1. They don't even listen to their mothers

  2. They don't listen even to their mothers

Here, assume there are some kids. These kids don't listen to anyone. not even to their mothers.

  • I would add a comma after listen in the second sentence. That aside, they are both fine. – Jason Bassford May 15 at 5:39
  • @JasonBassford so in my question, I should use "Here, assume there are some kids. These kids don't listen to anyone. even to their mothers." instead of "Here, assume there are some kids. These kids don't listen to anyone. not even to their mothers." – Bhakti Thakkar May 15 at 5:50
  • @JasonBassford there's no need to write "not" before even to their mothers – Bhakti Thakkar May 15 at 5:52
  • 1
    No. I mean: 2. They don't listen, even to their mother. (It would be more natural to add not but, strangely, it means the same thing without it in this construction.) – Jason Bassford May 15 at 6:00
  • @JasonBassford okay, thank you :)) – Bhakti Thakkar May 15 at 6:10
1

I think even is a word that can almost always be taken out without changing the meaning of the sentence.

To me, the sentences have equivalent meaning. But in the example 'They don't listen, even to their mothers' includes the 'even to their mothers' as an afterthought. So the second example seems more conversational to me.

I hope that helps.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.