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Do watch this movie. It won't leave you disappointed and the closure of this film truly lived up to the expectation.

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It won't leave you disappointed and the closure of this film truly lived up to the expectation.

Note that expectation is normally used in the plural.

In the first clause, won't is an abbreviation for will not (future tense), so you are actually mixing future and past. It is perfectly OK, and often happens, that you use different tenses in different clauses of a sentence... as long as you use the right tenses.

There are several possibilities, depending on the exact meaning of expectations. If you are talking about your own expectations, past tense is fine, because you have already seen the film:

It won't leave you disappointed, and the closure of this film truly lived up to my expectations.

If you are talking about the expectations of the person you are talking to, you must use future tense, because they will see the film in the future.

It won't leave you disappointed, and the closure of this film will truly live up to your expectations.

If you are talking about the expectations of people in general, you are talking about a universal truth- something that was true, is true, and always will be true. You use present tense to talk about universal truths, for example

water boils at 100 degrees

Your sentence referring to people in general would therefore be

It won't leave you disappointed, and the closure of this film truly lives up to expectations.

  • ... any particular reason for the downvote? – JavaLatte May 16 at 6:56

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