1

Which one is the correct sentence?

I know him before I know you

or

I've known him before I've known you

  • 2
    Neither. I knew him before I knew you. Or perhaps better, I've known him longer than I've known you. – FumbleFingers May 16 at 11:35
  • 2
    Note that I knew him before you and I've known him longer than you are also both valid and would often be used by native speakers. Those versions are potentially ambiguous (they might mean ...before you knew him / ...longer than you have known him), but the intended sense would usually be contextually obvious (in the mind of the speaker, if not the addressee), so that wouldn't normally be seen as a problem at time of utterance. – FumbleFingers May 16 at 11:46
  • @FumbleFingers thank u. I really like this platform. I learn a lot here – Bhakti Thakkar May 17 at 4:27
  • Note for some learners: To Know(state) is not the same as To Meet (action). First you meet someone, then you get to know them until you feel you finally know them. – EnglishAdam May 17 at 4:51
1

Neither of OP's suggestions are idiomatic. Common alternatives are...

1: I knew him before I knew you
and perhaps better,
2: I've known him longer than I've known you


Note that...

1a: I knew him before you
and
2a: I've known him longer than you

...are also both valid and would often be used by native speakers. Those versions are potentially ambiguous (they might mean ...before you knew him / ...longer than you have known him). But the intended sense would usually be contextually obvious (in the mind of the speaker, if not the addressee), so that wouldn't normally be seen as a problem at time of utterance.

0

"I know him before I know you" should use the past verb (knew). As in:

"I knew him before I knew you."

Other than that, both are correct.
Though, the second one could be better if written as,

"I've known him before I knew you"

  • 1
    I query the correctness of I've known him before I've known you. Can you substantiate it? – Ronald Sole May 16 at 13:09
  • What @RonaldSole said. That construction isn't at all idiomatic for me as a competent native (BrE) speaker. – FumbleFingers May 17 at 11:36

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