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I don't know when to use "start on" instead of "start", ıs there a difference in meaning if I omit "on" ?

1- We're starting a new book in class that's supposed to be really interesting.

1a- We're starting on a new book in class that's supposed to be really interesting.

2- He's just started a new job.

2a- He's just started on a new job

3- You’d better start on your homework.

3a- You’d better start your homework.

4- I'll get started on the dishes if you want to put the kids to bed.

4a- I'll get started the dishes if you want to put the kids to bed.

Is it possible to use the second versions of the examples ?

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  • 4a isn't idiomatic - you either get started on [process, object of attention] or you get [process] started. Or simply start [process]. Thus I'll get started on the dishes, I'll get the dishes started, or I'll start the dishes. All permutations except your version! May 17, 2019 at 18:11
  • The others seem okay to you? May 17, 2019 at 19:05
  • Yes. You can start [task] or start on [task], and you can get started on [task]. But you can't get started [task] without including on. May 19, 2019 at 13:58

1 Answer 1

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On X can express X is a current topic or task.

Today we will have a discussion on history.

I am working on the unprocessed invoices.

The logic with start on X is that you are making X the current topic or task.

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