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I think I understand the meaning of this structure with noun "as is + noun" but I don't really understand when it used with adjective "as is + adjective".

1- But she’s also finding that the acting industry she left behind is very different now. As is New York City. (The acting industry is different as New York is different now)

2- Parties are a regular feature of life at Seaside. As is bad news. (The parties are a regular feature as bad news are a regular feature)

3- The decline in this structure leads, as is typical in such situations, to a change in its associated meanings

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I would interpret sentence 1 as: "The acting industry is very different now; New York is also very different now". Thsi sentence does not imply that the difference is of the same kind, or the same degree, just that the verb phrase "very different now" applies to both.

Similarly with #2 which could be recast as : "Parties are a regular feature as bad news are a regular feature, Bad news is also a regular feature"

Sentence 3 could be rewritten as:

The decline in this structure leads to a change in its associated meanings. Such a decline typically leads to such a change.

That is the phrase "as is typical in such situations" indicates that the sequence of events is a normal or typical one.

Other uses of "as is " +adjective:

  • His pulse was elevated, as is normal for an 82-year-old under stress.
  • He followed the laws, as is sensible.
  • Fill out the form completely, as is necessary for it to be processed.

In none of these does "as is" serve as an "also" to indicate two things to which the same verb can be applied. Rather, the phrase after "as is" qualifies the main clause, or tells the reader more about the situation.

  • Thanks, but I can't understand this example "He followed the laws, as is sensible". Is he sensible? or following the laws is sensible? And also I feel like I can omit "as is" when it is used with "an adjective" remaining the meaning. For example I think this sentence is okay: The decline in this structure leads, typical in such situations, to a change in its associated meanings – Talha Özden May 19 at 2:19
  • @Talha Özden my example means that it is sensible to follow the law, and thast he is sensible for doing so. Your modified sentence in your comment omitting "as is" is not grammatical. It could be split into two valid sentences: "The decline in this structure leads to a change in its associated meanings. This is typical of such situations." – David Siegel May 19 at 2:31
  • I am suprised to know it is ungrammatical. Because I have seen such usages for example: "Cluster of leaves revolved it slowly, tracing, like the leg of compass, a thin red circle in the water." I mean in that example above "like the leg of compass" qualifies the main clause as your examples do. What if I use this way : "The decline in this structure leads to a change in its associated meanings, typical in such situations." – Talha Özden May 19 at 2:40
  • I would say that "like the leg of compass" should be "the leg of a compass" (or perhaps "the compass", depending on context.) Where did you see this? "The decline in this structure leads to a change in its associated meanings, typical in such situations." seems fine to me. – David Siegel May 19 at 2:44
  • (Great Gastby, novel by F. Scott Fitzgerald) – Talha Özden May 19 at 2:45

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