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I am confused which preposition is correct in the statement:

Best return on your money.

or

Best return for your money.

?

Which do you think is correct? Please explain.

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  • More context please
    – Kaique
    May 19 '19 at 21:21
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Best return on your money.

This one is totally correct.

"Return on" is a phrasal verb which means according to Longman Dictionary:

The amount of profit that you get from something.

That something would be determined if the preposition "from" was added before/after the prepositional phrase (i.e., "on" and its predicate).

Your sentence, as a whole, means I wish you the best net profit that would be generated/resulted on your money.

Best return for your money.

This one is a bit odd. It means I wish your money the best net profit instead of, for example, I wish you the best net profit.

You can rewrite it:

Best return for you.

to be realistic and correct. And, it would mean I wish you the best net profit.

Note: The profit may be a gain or loss, but regardless both cases, your sentence first part indicates that I'm wishing you the best.

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